Friday, 29 October 2010

Which review sites do you use?

As you can imagine,  I don't really use review sites very much so I thought it would be worthwhile asking which sites developers found the most useful and why.

Ideally I'd like to build up a useful list that everyone who visits the blog can use and benefit from.

Comment in which sites are most useful to you.

I hope that you find this useful. If you have suggestions for future articles or if there's anything in the article you want to discuss further then please email me at ashley@mobilemusicappmarketing.com. If you like this article then please consider sharing it using the buttons below.

Thursday, 28 October 2010

Don't forget the conventional press

When you're launching your new app or huge update consider contacting magazines like Computer Music as they seem to be featuring more and more mobile apps on a regular basis.

I hope that you find this useful. If you have suggestions for future articles or if there's anything in the article you want to discuss further then please email me at ashley@mobilemusicappmarketing.com. If you like this article then please consider sharing it using the buttons below.

Wednesday, 27 October 2010

How do you use your promo codes

What do you use them for and how do you make best promotional use of them? I've heard from developers who have sent promo codes to multiple review sites and never heard from the reviewers at all. I'm sure there a lots of stories of promo codes not being used and being wasted sadly.

So here are some ideas for what to do with your codes that could help you get some promotion out of your codes.
  1. Give codes to reviewers / sites where they'll be actually used (PalmSounds of course, but others too, such as CDM, Matrixsynth, Synthtopia).
  2. Give codes away for reviews. You can do this via twitter or your blog etc, but make sure when you offer the code
  3. Run promo code competitions, through a blog (like PalmSounds), or anyone else for that matter.
  4. Offer codes to loyal customers who have bought a different product already
Codes can be a really effective tool for marketing your app and should be used carefully. Every code given away should get you some kind of publicity. A review on the app store, on a site somewhere and extend your marketing reach.

If you've come across an innovative use of promo codes please share it.

I hope that you find this useful. If you have suggestions for future articles or if there's anything in the article you want to discuss further then please email me at ashley@mobilemusicappmarketing.com. If you like this article then please consider sharing it using the buttons below.

Monday, 25 October 2010

Inside the box

Having worked in marketing for years I was almost always annoyed when people talked about 'thinking outside the box'. A great deal of the time I didn't know what the box was or where it was, or why it was we needed to be outside of it.

It demonstrated to me that often there is a misconception that doing something different is the key to success for a project or product and that's not always true. Thinking outside the box is almost always synonymous with innovation, and yet in my experience things seldom work that simply.

Don't get me wrong, I'm not saying that being innovative is wrong in any way, but being innovative isn't the same as thinking outside the box.

A lot of the time what we really mean by thinking outside the box is to attempt to solve a problem creatively, and what better people to be creative than creative coders making creative applications, for creative musicians (I apologise for the overuse of the word 'creative').

In many cases using standard marketing tools and methods is the most appropriate and the most effective way to promote and market any service or product. After all, taking this approach is often what consumers understand and can relate to. Being too innovative can have the result of alienating potential customers or leaving them feeling that they whatever the product or service is, it isn't aimed at them.

So don't overlook traditional channels, price promotions, advertising, etc when thinking about how to market your app. Not everyone is on twitter and facebook although at times it can feel that way.

Friday, 22 October 2010

How audiences differ

An interesting article at emarketer on how different audiences have different tastes.

I hope that you find this useful. If you have suggestions for future articles or if there's anything in the article you want to discuss further then please email me at ashley@mobilemusicappmarketing.com. If you like this article then please consider sharing it using the buttons below.

Thursday, 21 October 2010

Twittering to a schedule

We are all busy and have lots to do, so it can be difficult at times to maintain a steady stream into social media sites like twitter. However, you could consider scheduling your messages in twitter using something like hootsuite.

You might think that it isn't a particularly good use of twitter, and takes out the human touch. Well, in some ways I might agree. Scheduling tweets has to be used alongside being an active user, if nothing else, so that you can reply when people act on or reply to your tweets. However, it can be a simple way of maintaining a consistent flow of messages even when you can't be there all the time to do it yourself.

I hope that you find this useful. If you have suggestions for future articles or if there's anything in the article you want to discuss further then please email me at ashley@mobilemusicappmarketing.com. If you like this article then please consider sharing it using the buttons below.

Wednesday, 20 October 2010

Making your blog an email newsletter

I talked yesterday about using an email newsletter for marketing. One simple way of doing that is using feedburner to offer email subscriptions to your blog. Of course, it isn't a full newsletter, more of a first step toward that, but often people like to get an email rather than visiting your blog or reading it in a feed reader.

Also, often readers will want to keep an article or post, and having it in their inbox or a folder is simple way to retrieve it.

Feedburner can do all of that for you and is really simple to set up. Worth considering.

I hope that you find this useful. If you have suggestions for future articles or if there's anything in the article you want to discuss further then please email me at ashley@mobilemusicappmarketing.com. If you like this article then please consider sharing it using the buttons below.

Tuesday, 19 October 2010

Why have a newsletter?

That's a good question. You might have a website, a blog, be on twitter and facebook, so why go that extra mile?

Good question. Simply put there are still lots of stats which point to consumers still liking to get information via email.

An email newsletter doesn't have to be a huge amount of work either. It can be quite a simple affair. Here are some tips.
  1. You don't need to write a novel, be concise and format your newsletter so it is easy to read.
  2. Think about email newsletters you've received and which ones you read and which you instantly bin, make your newsletter like the former.
  3. A quick news round up can be useful, but again, keep it concise. Often readers might have seen a news item on twitter or elsewhere, so make it brief and offer links out to your blog or site for more information.
  4. Highlight user stories if you have them, especially where a user has used your app to solve a problem or used the app in an innovative way
  5. If possible offer something for signing up to the newsletter, exclusive content, first looks at new features etc.
A newsletter doesn't have to be a huge amount of work, but it can be more personal that a blog post or twitter / facebook feed. It is worth thinking about.

I hope that you find this useful. If you have suggestions for future articles or if there's anything in the article you want to discuss further then please email me at ashley@mobilemusicappmarketing.com. If you like this article then please consider sharing it using the buttons below.

Monday, 18 October 2010

At the end of the product lifecycle

There's plenty of apps out there which haven't been updated for a long time. Users often call them abandonware, which may be true in some cases. But if you've got an app in the store that you don't plan to do much with anymore because you're working on something else, or for whatever reason, it doesn't mean that it can't generate interest for you. Here are a few ideas you could consider.
  1. Make the app free for a period of time to generate some interest and get picked up by the sites who post on apps that change to free like freeappalert.
  2. Reduce the price for a while or for good
  3. If you make your app free consider adding some advertising to it so you get something back for it.
Whatever you do make sure you let people know what you're doing. Tell people that the apps is free on twitter, in your blog, on facebook etc and use that to promote your new app, or whatever else you're doing to get some publicity from it.

I hope that you find this useful. If you have suggestions for future articles or if there's anything in the article you want to discuss further then please email me at ashley@mobilemusicappmarketing.com. If you like this article then please consider sharing it using the buttons below.

Friday, 15 October 2010

Music Hack Day Boston is tomorrow

And that's a good way to get some publicity for your app whether you're going to the event or not. Why not consider running a price discount on your app or even making it free to celebrate the event.

If you do, then make sure you publicise it on twitter and use the music hack day hashtag.

I hope that you find this useful. If you have suggestions for future articles or if there's anything in the article you want to discuss further then please email me at ashley@mobilemusicappmarketing.com. If you like this article then please consider sharing it using the buttons below.

Thursday, 14 October 2010

Socially Responsible Marketing

Partnering with a good cause as part of your marketing is not only a good way of promoting your product, but is in itself just a good thing to do. However, you need to make sure that if you do something like this you do it right. Here are a few pointers.
  1. Make sure you pick a cause which will be relevant to your users in some way and not so removed from what they're interested in as to be inaccessible to them
  2. If at all possible make sure that the charity or organisation you decide on is aware of what you're doing and understand what you're offering.
  3. Make your connection to the charity clear to everyone. For example, support a specific fund raising day for the charity by offering them all proceeds from your app sales on that day.
  4. Make sure users know that on that particular day if they buy your app the money will go to the charity
  5. Promote in advance of the event, during the day or whatever time period it is, and then tell people how much you raised for the charity, and thank them for buying your app to help the charity.
  6. Make sure you have a good contact within the charity organisation so they know what you're doing.
  7. If the charity has brand guidelines or similar, stick to them.
  8. Feel good about doing it.
I hope that you find this useful. If you have suggestions for future articles or if there's anything in the article you want to discuss further then please email me at ashley@mobilemusicappmarketing.com. If you like this article then please consider sharing it using the buttons below.

Wednesday, 13 October 2010

Understanding Facebook artist pages v profiles

Here's a useful article at hypebot on understanding facebook artist pages v profiles. Facebook is a useful and important too for social media marketing so understanding how things work is important.

I hope that you find this useful. If you have suggestions for future articles or if there's anything in the article you want more on then please email me at ashley@mobilemusicappmarketingcom.

Tuesday, 12 October 2010

How do you use pricing?

I've talked about pricing before, but it is a subject that doesn't always get the notice it should. The app store gives developers the ability to run price promotions on a schedule and that's a great tool for marketing.

For instance, you could run a schedule that offers a discount on a certain day of the week, or at weekends for a specific month, or tie pricing into special events.

Pricing is a very powerful tool to get users to respond to. Often I've seen users comment that they would've bought this or that app if the price was X or Y. Offering discounts on a regular or occasional basis can generate interest and sales, so it is worth giving some thought to.

I hope that you find this useful. If you have suggestions for future articles or if there's anything in the article you want to discuss further then please email me at ashley@mobilemusicappmarketing.com. If you like this article then please consider sharing it using the buttons below.

Monday, 11 October 2010

Tipping point

Marketers often talk about a tipping point for a product or a campaign. This is where the product or service gains such a foothold in the target market that users or consumers start to become an active part of the campaign and it can go viral.

Getting to a tipping point is no easy task. You'll be able to find lots and lots of sites that will give you advice on how to get your campaign to go viral, but even if you follow all the advice you can eat it won't guarantee success.

You can have the best video campaign on YouTube, the best product and still it won't necessarily get you noticed.

One way to build recognition is to offer something for your users to publicise your product. This could be an additional sample pack in return for tweeting the product details or something similar.

If you're thinking of doing something like that then you might want to try out Pay with a tweet. Using that or something like it could get your users to generate publicity for you.

Friday, 8 October 2010

Try before you buy

I don't think that there is an answer to this question really. I know developers have been divided over whether or not free or lite versions actually work and can convert into purchases of a full and paid app.

For some types of app I can see that it would work. Some games for example. But for others I can see that it just becomes a lot of extra work for the developer.

In-app purchases can be a good way to get around this. Some apps have been released free for basic functionality and have lots of purchasable additional content.

But essentially the decision to have a lite or free version is going to depend on the developer and the kind of app they've put out.

Of course, you can monetize apps with advertising, but that isn't always a popular idea with users although I suspect that it will become more and more popular over time.

I hope that you find this useful. If you have suggestions for future articles or if there's anything in the article you want to discuss further then please email me at ashley@mobilemusicappmarketing.com. If you like this article then please consider sharing it using the buttons below.